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Gyoza (Pot sticker)

from "Dim Sum" by Ellen Leong Blonder


To make your pot stickers juicy:

  1. Steaming time should be no longer 6 minutes. Don't cook too long. You have to serve when the meat been just cooked and gives its juice out, before it is absorbed into the wrapper.
  2. Choose thick wrappers, so the skin won't rip while you are cooking.
  3. Juice comes from the meat, so keep the meat ratio high.
  4. Make your own large wrappers, if you can. More meat gives more juice, which means bigger pot stickers have better chance.

Ingredients for 24 pot stickers

Instruction
  1. Slice very thinly or shred:
    8 ounces (225 grams) finely shredded napa cabbage
     
  2. Spread it out in a flat pan and sprinkle 1 tablespoon salt and set it aside for 30 minutes or wilted.

     
  3. Squeeze water out as much as possible with your both bands. Mix well in a bowl:
    squeezed napa cabbage
    8 ounces (225 grams) ground pork
    1 1/2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger (20 grams)
    3 cloves garlic (finely chopped)
    1 scallion finely sliced (3 tablespoons, 25 grams)
    2 teaspoons soy sauce
    2 teaspoons rice wine
    1 teaspoon sugar
    1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
     
  4. Refrigerate the filling for at least 20 minutes, and up to 2 hours.
     
  5. Wrap 2 teaspoons of filling with a pot sticker dough. Seal well.


  6. Heat a skillet; then add 1 tablespoon of the oil. When it is almost smoking, arrange the post stickers so they are not touching. Pan fry for 2 to 3 minutes over medium heat, checking frequently to make sure they are not burning. Reduce the heat if they are browning too quickly.
     
  7. Carefully pour 1/2 cup of water into the skillet and cover and steam for 5 to 6 minutes. If it start sizzling noises for lack of water, add a little water and cover again.


  8. After 5 to 6 minutes if the water is almost evaporated, you added just right amount of water. If not, remove the lid and let the water evaporate. If there are too much water, drain. Add 1/2 tablespoon oil and fry for one minute. Serve immediately.


This recipe is from "Dim Sum: The Art of Chinese Tea Lunch" by Ellen Leong Blonder. She provides 60 recipes, from siu mai to egg custard tarts, all illustrated by her own lovely watercolors. Every recipe I have tried turned out successful.


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